SAMAC Bursary 2023-2024

Date:

spot_imgspot_img

SAMAC Bursary 2023-2024, The members of Macadamias South Africa NPC (often referred to as SAMAC) include producers, nurseries, handlers, and business service providers. A group of growers came together to join SAMAC in order to pool their resources and handle shared difficulties and problems. Through technical and marketing innovation, the organization’s aim is to be pioneers in the creation of a successful and sustainable industry in the common interests of its members.

SAMAC Bursary 2023-2024

ABOUT THE BURSARY PROGRAMME – FIELDS COVERED

SAMAC will be awarding bursaries to provide financial assistance to students who are unable to afford to study, but wish to pursue a career in the Macadamia industry within South Africa. Bursaries will be awarded for studies towards the following qualifications:

Undergraduate studies:

  • Agricultural Economics (BSc)
  • Agricultural Management (National Diploma)
  • Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural Engineering) (BSc)
  • Entomology (BSc)
  • Extension and Rural development (BSc)
  • Food Science (BSc)
  • Forestry (National Diploma)
  • Forestry and Wood Science (BSc)
  • Plant Pathology (BSc)

Postgraduate studies (Honours/ Masters/ PhD) in the macadamia field.

MORE ABOUT THE BURSARY PROGRAMME – SERVICE CONTRACT & SELECTION

Bursaries will be awarded based mainly on the applicants academic potential and financial need.

The value of the bursary will be dependent on each individual case, and the amount will be reviewed annually.

SAPREF Bursary 2023-2024

After graduation, student will be required to work for a macadamia-related company, organisation or institution within South Africa (which is approved by SAMAC). The period of work contract will be equal to the period of bursary funding received.

Shortlisted applicants will be contacted – if you do not receive any feedback by 31 March 2021 at the latest, please regard your application as unsuccessful.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

Applicants must satisfy the following minimum entry criteria before applying (please note that failure to satisfy all the requirements will lead to your application not being considered):
Undergraduate students:

  • South African citizen
  • Completed Matric OR currently in Matric
  • Studying towards a Undergraduate Agriculture qualification (National Diploma/ BTech/ BSc)
  • Studying at a recognised South African tertiary institution
  • Strong academic record
  • Previously disadvantaged, impoverished students
  • Students with disabilities are encouraged to apply
  • Preference will be given to 3rd and 4th year students

Postgraduate students:

  • South African citizen
  • Completed Matric
  • Studying towards a Postgraduate macadamia-related qualification (Honours/ Masters/ PhD)
  • Studying at a recognised South African tertiary institution
  • Strong academic record
  • Previously disadvantaged, impoverished students
  • Students with disabilities are encouraged to apply

 

HOW TO APPLY FOR THE BURSARY

Download and complete one of the following bursary application forms:
Undergraduate studies: SAMAC Bursary Application Form (Undergraduate) (.pdf)
Postgraduate studies: SAMAC Bursary Application Form (Postgraduate) (.pdf)
Submit clear copies of the following supporting documentation along with your completed application form (the submission of these documents is compulsory – if any items are missing, your application be disregarded):
Undergraduate students:

  • ID document (certified copy)
  • Matric certificate, if completed Matric (certified copy)
  • June 2020 results or progress report of all subjects (if no exams were written), if at tertiary level
  • Official proof of registration at a tertiary institution in SA
  • Parents/ guardians proof of income (latest payslips/ letter from employer and sworn statement/ tax return statement stating income, if employed; latest financial statements, if self-employed; sworn affidavits, if unemployed; SASSA confirmation letter, if applicable; divorce certificate, if divorced; death certificates, if deceased; sworn statement from one parent, if separated)

Postgraduate students:

  • ID document (certified copy)
  • Matric certificate (certified copy)
  • Official Degree certificates (certified copy)
  • Official proof of registration at a tertiary institution in SA
  • Parents/ guardians proof of income (latest payslips/ letter from employer and sworn statement/ tax return statement stating income, if employed; latest financial statements, if self-employed; sworn affidavits, if unemployed; SASSA confirmation letter, if applicable; divorce certificate, if divorced; death certificates, if deceased; sworn statement from one parent, if separated)
  • Macadamia-related research proposal

SAMAC Bursary 2023-2024

Applications must be submitted via email to: transformation@samac.org.za
(Please insert the words “SAMAC Bursary Scheme: Undergraduate” or “SAMAC Bursary Scheme: Postgraduate” in the email subject line).

CONTACT THE BURSARY PROVIDER

For any queries related to this bursary programme, please contact SAMAC directly:
Tel: 012 349 1906
Email: transformation@samac.org.za

Can I plant macadamias in my area?

Macadamias are a subtropical fruit tree crop that originated in Australia and more importantly is closely related to Protea species that we are so familiar with in South Africa.

This similarity between macadamias and Protea species largely dictate where macadamias can and cannot be cultivated. Macadamia trees are, however, fairly tough trees and have been shown to survive and produce in a range of climatically different areas.

It is well known that better crack outs (kernel as a percentage of dry nut in shell weight) are usually achieved at lower altitude due to the nuts developing thinner shells at lower altitudes, where it is generally warmer. Even at low altitudes, macadamias grown in warmer areas will have thinner shells.

Nuts from the North Coast of KwaZulu-Natal have thinner shells than nuts from the cooler South Coast. Macadamia plantings in Mpumalanga and Limpopo range between 600 and 1200 m AMSL. It is however probably not the altitude that determines the kernel percentage, but the climatic conditions associated with the altitudes.

The higher the humidity, the better, and moderate temperatures in combination with high humidity seem to be ideal. When the plants are under less stress, less energy is used for shell production with resultantly thinner shells. Macadamia trees are susceptible to both heat and frost damage.

Young trees are readily killed by frost, whereas older trees usually survive. Frost can still damage flowers and result in lower fruit (nut) set. Temperatures above 35 °C, on the other hand, become too high and reduce photosynthesis.

SAMAC Bursary 2023-2024

Therefore tropical and subtropical regions are more suitable; however there are areas in highlands that produce macadamia nuts, and the micro climate will play a more vital role in these areas, for instance using micro irrigation as opposed to drip irrigation to increase humidity or planting on the cooler or hotter slopes, etc.

It should be noted that macadamias have also been established in some non-traditional areas and have shown to be economically viable. Before planting macadamias in a new area, it is highly advisable to contact a macadamia specialist to aid you in your decision.

What should I look for when buying macadamia trees?

It is important to buy good quality planting stock when establishing an orchard. We suggest that you buy from an Seedling Growers Association of South Africa (SGASA) accredited nursery, which is also a SAMAC Registered Nursery.

Click on the link to find a list of nurseries (https://www.samac.org.za/nurseries).

Avoid trees that are stunted, pot-bound or infested with pests or infected by a disease. To ensure the orchard gets off to a good start, select vigorously growing trees free from nutrient disorders, insect pests and disease with a good healthy root system. Buyers should look closely for:

  • A healthy well-formed root system that is not spiralled or twisted.
  • A root system that has masses of very fine roots throughout the potting mix.
  • A potting mix that is well-drained, friable, and free from waterlogging and hard compacted clods.
  • Healthy, vigorous, well-formed growth with dark green foliage/plant leaves.
  • A minimum of 150 mm of hardened new growth above the graft. This should consist of at least two growth flushes with a strong graft union.
  • Trees that are free from insect pests and diseases.

SAMAC Bursary 2023-2024

When are macadamias ready for harvesting?

  • Remove the husks (dehusk) preferably within 24 hours of harvesting, particularly if the husks are closed.
  • Dry the dehusked nuts in drying bins with ambient air or hang in onion bags in a dry, airy, shaded location for approximately 3 months to reduce the moisture content by approximately 10 to 15% (depends on the industry standard).
  • Store on the hot water cylinder for a minimum of 3 weeks. The additional dry out weight loss will be approximately 8%. (a dehumidifier can be very helpful)
  • Now dry and ready for cracking, the kernel will ideally be rattling in the shell and above all will be crunchy and savoury or sweet – depending on the variety.
  • Nuts can be taken to our SAMAC accredited Handlers (https://www.samac.org.za/handlers/).

What are the water requirements for macadamia trees?

Although research in this field is still underway, it is currently accepted that a mature macadamia tree needs approximately 500 – 600 mm of water per annum to produce a sustainable yield. It should however be noted that although large areas of South Africa have an annual rainfall exceeding the amount of water required by macadamias, this rainfall is not evenly distributed and as a result supplemental irrigation might be required, especially during certain phenological periods.

In areas with a well distributed rainfall and high potential soils, macadamias are successfully cultivated without any irrigation, but in these areas small trees (less than 3 years) are usually watered by hand until an extensive root system has been established and trees are capable of extracting larger volumes of soil water and nutrients.

August and September are the periods with the highest irrigation requirements due to low rainfall, high temperatures and low relative humidity. Furthermore, a high water demand arises in August and September, which are the months when most cultivars flower and nuts set.

spot_imgspot_imgspot_imgspot_img

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Share post:

Subscribe

spot_imgspot_img

Popular

More like this
Related

Top Best Hotel In Arusha City

Arusha, Tanzania Hotel Deals-Top Best Hotel In Arusha City Top...

Valencia lodging options The BEST Valencia Accommodations in Spain [2022]

Valencia lodging options The BEST Valencia Accommodations in Spain...

BEST Baby Smile Quotes – Quotes About the Cutest Thing in the World

BEST Baby Smile Quotes – Quotes About the Cutest...

Wild Animals in Morocco | Wildlife in Morocco

Wild Animals in Morocco | Wildlife in Morocco Wild Animals...